Bike Drama: PowerTap P1 Pedals

Sometimes I get overwhelmed with what I like to call BIKE DRAMA (BD). BD is when something on your bike breaks or doesn’t work correctly when you least expect it. The more you ride, the more drama you have and my friends will tell you that I am kind of a drama magnet. When faced with BD, it’s best to stay cool, but when you need to get a specific workout done/uploaded for your coach, or you are 30 mins out from your TT start…let’s just say on the inside I’ve wanted to cry out of frustration.

When a friend of mine got their set of PowerTap P1 Pedals, I was envious because I was experiencing some power-related BD at that time. My crank-based power meter just stopped working after a long stretch of travel. I was procrastinating on sending it back to for repairs because I did’t have another crankset handy with the same crank length. The idea of asking around for one seemed weird plus I was in the middle of a big week of volume so I was not feeling the positive vibes (full of excuses lol). My buddy told me good things about the P1 Pedals so I decided to make the switch. I really liked the idea of being able to swap out the pedals form my road to TT bike. Installation seemed easier and I was already using Look pedals so my cleats/shoes were GTG.

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Post-hammerfesting! Photo Cred: Justin Stanley. Training ride with Bat City Cycling in Cedar Park, TX. http://www.batcitycycling.com

I took my TT bike (Cannondale Slice, Di2 Shimano Dura Ace, Garmin Edge 520) in to my local bike shop for installation which went smoothly. My mechanic used a 8mm hex wrench and they went on like any other pedal. There was no charging nessesary as they are powered by AAA lithium batteries (included). My Garmin picked up the signal (pedals are ANT and Bluetooth smart) and calibration was simple. I opted to have my Garmin calibrate, or manual zero, before every ride just to account for different temps (trainer vs. outside). Also, The PowerTap assumes a 172.5 mm crank length unless otherwise indicated by you on the head unit. Everything worked great and I got an accurate read on my power. Easy peasy, totally plug and play (60 hours of play to be exact before it’s time to change batteries).

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Somewhere in Georgia. TT Natz 2017. Photo Cred: Weldon Weaver

The downside to these pedals are that they are a tad heavy (398 grams per pair of pedals without batteries). I’d expect any power pedals to be bulky. I did a little research on the Look Keo Power Dual Mode Regular pedals and found that they where a little lighter (398 grams per the pair with sensors). The stack height of the P1’s is 14mm compared to the Keo which is 17.5 mm. Maybe this matters a bit for fast cornering, but I personally am not a criterium specailist (endurance girl 4 life haha) so the bulk was NBD to me.

 

 

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GIRL POWAH 😉 looking at my Garmin at The Driveway Series Austin, TX

I’ve had my pedals now since May and so far so good–NO DRAMA. I since moved them over to my road bike (with Sram Red Etap) and there was no issue–I had to get help from my LBS to swap ’em and create another bike profile on my Garmin but that was it. Oh yeah, the batteries died on me, but that was an easy fix. For someone like me that trains, races and travels a lot with multiple bikes, the PowerTap  P1 pedals are perfect. I can do it all (solo training, group rides, races, TT’s) with the same power meter. Over the years I’ve really come to appreicate products that are versatile, durable and easy to use. Here’s to less drama and more GURL POWAH 😉

 

With love,

WC @wattage_cottage

 

2 thoughts on “Bike Drama: PowerTap P1 Pedals

Add yours

  1. I’ve been looking to get a power meter so thanks for the review. And LBS means….London Business School? lbs=pounds? Oh wait! Local Bike Shop!! Got it!

    Liked by 1 person

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